Win an iPad Pro: share how you Miro in the online classroom templates challenge 🧑‍🏫

  • 30 August 2021
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Win an iPad Pro: share how you Miro in the online classroom templates challenge 🧑‍🏫

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Jenny Kowalski, Assistant Professor of Instruction in Graphic & Interactive Design, Tyler School of Art & Architecture at Temple University

Accessibility Scavenger Hunt

The devices we use everyday come with a ton of tools for accessibility. This scavenger hunt helps students recognize accessibility tools, demonstrate how they work, and understand more about how the world can be designed for everyone.

For this activity, students were divided into teams of 3-4 people. This activity would work in an in-person, hybrid, or virtual classroom. The entire activity took around an hour and a half to introduce and complete.

To use the board, copy the “team 1” area and duplicate it for as many teams as you have. 

Each team adds team member names to their area of the board. They review the resources and work together with their computers, phones, and the world around them to post a screenshot or photo of each listed accessibility tool, app, or feature. 

After they complete the activity, they use sticky notes to reflect on their experience. 

 

 

Here are screenshots of a completed Scavenger Hunt board: 

Completed activity including photos of computer screens and phone screenshots
What surprised you about this Exercise? Sticky note responses say: “I never realized there was a transcript option  on podcast for people to read along.” “I was surprised for how many different options there are to aid people who are hard or hearing or visually impaired.” “I am surprised that there sensory warnings for videos were just put in place about a year ago on tiktok. Plus there are some videos that do not have those types of warnings for one who is sensitive to flashing lights.” “You can potentially put captions on a face time call??”
What surprised you about this Exercise? Sticky note responses say: “The computer features being in a different space” “the number options I didn't know existed” “I never knew about smart inverted colors on the iPhone” “things that seem high contrast to me (a fully sighted person) are not high contrast”
What do you want to learn more about, and why? Sticky note responses say: “I would like to learn more about color blind safe palettes and incorporate them into my work” “I would like to learn more about media and videos (i noticed apple podcasts didn't have transcripts)” “I also think it'd be cool to learn how they test out the visual accessibility modes to make it work for everyone”

 

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