Brainstorm your brainstorm

  • 26 February 2020
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I’ve recently came across the article on effective brainstorming techniques on Medium - https://medium.com/taking-note/effective-brainstorming-techniques-c84a1158134d

Top highlight:

In any brainstorm, there’s usually a handful of people who do most of the talking, while others only pipe up when asked to share.

 

:thinking: I wonder, what are the golden rules of brainstorming sessions for you and your team? 


3 replies

Hi There!

In my experience I found out that the Brainwritting technique is quite usefull actually. If you haven’t heard of it, here’s an example!  - https://www.thisisservicedesigndoing.com/methods/brainwriting 

It works wonders for introverted personalities, allows everyone to finish on time and we get good results for as few as 3 people or as many as 255 (the biggest session I’ve seen). This has work for me for every session and I use it all the time. 

This technique can work as a support format for other brainstorming methods such as S.C.A.M.P.E.R and they work well together. Let me know what you think of this!

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I’m retired.  A team of only 1.  However, I’ve set up a test board, to collaborate with a few friends who also want the flexibility that Miro offers.

What I like most is not being limited to one item….a flowchart, or a mind map, or an org chart.  It can be all of these things, or more. It’s just a digital whiteboard, where I can doodle ideas of all kinds. If I had a team today, working on a particular problem, I would encourage all ideas, no matter how crazy-sounding...and doodles….notes...sketches…pictures...links…..whatever seemed to pertain in the slightest, to the issue at hand.

Here’s my test board, and this only starts to scratch the surface of possibilities with Miro.

The Team “test board”

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It works wonders for introverted personalities, allows everyone to finish on time and we get good results for as few as 3 people or as many as 255 (the biggest session I’ve seen). This has work for me for every session and I use it all the time. 

 

@Alexis Benavides Good stuff.  In my working years, I was with a very large West Coast bank. We’d do these “brainstorm” meetings, where some hired facilitator would start off by saying, “Remember, there are no bad ideas.”….only to belittle the first idea that seemed to be just a little “off the wall”. I quickly learned, that if you valued your career, silence was an excellent option. The brain-writing seems ideal for those situations where actual novel ideas are not appreciated, or where one or two individuals dominate.

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