Solved

Free plan includes anonymous collaboration (or not?)

  • 29 June 2020
  • 3 replies
  • 111 views

Hi, I heard at weekend that the free plan would now support anonymous collaboration and even saw a screenshot. I downloaded the windows 64-bit Miro version, but still canot see that functionality.
Is it released. It is fantastic news for working with non-profits and community groups.

Thanks, Jean

icon

Best answer by Kiron Bondale 29 June 2020, 15:02

@JeanF -

The free plan already offers unlimited full access users - they aren’t anonymous, but the anonymous access has a number of downsides including the ability to have “named” users on a board and no password protection to restrict access to the board.

Is there a concern with having “named” users?

Kiron

View original

3 replies

Userlevel 7

@JeanF -

The free plan already offers unlimited full access users - they aren’t anonymous, but the anonymous access has a number of downsides including the ability to have “named” users on a board and no password protection to restrict access to the board.

Is there a concern with having “named” users?

Kiron

Hi Kiron,

I use free when working with a variety of community groups and not for profits. The ability to quickly share a board to collaborate is great and I am ok with anonymous access. It avoids the overhead of multiple people having to create a miro login for a one off session. I am sure Miro appreciate the need since it exists in the paid plan.

I had been using http://webwhiteboard.com/ from the wonderful Henrik Kniberg. Henrik recommended all his users convert to miro and has discontinued his product. He advised me over the weekend that anon collaboration was now being provided (I had raised the issue some weeks ago). Is it perhaps a release timing issue?

Thanks

Jean

Userlevel 7

@JeanF -

Unfortunately this is not a feature which is available in the free plan as per the following Help Center article: https://help.miro.com/hc/en-us/articles/360012524559-Collaboration-with-Anonymous-Guest-Editors

Most likely, the rationale was that the free plan doesn’t restrict how many editors you can invite to a board, albeit with the requirement that they all register Miro accounts.

Kiron

Reply